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Feb 04, 2014 | 10:05 AM

Same Game, New Rules

You say the game is too difficult, you say the USGA should never have banned long putters, you say the Rules of Golf have become so complicated and restrictive that the game isn’t fun anymore. Take heart. The recent PGA Merchandise Show brought the launch of something called the RGAA—Recreational Golf Association of America. Its Executive Director, golf equipment industry veteran John Hoeflich, says, "Our plan is to simplify the rules to make them easier to learn and allow technology that will make clubs and balls easier to hit. Our plan is not to challenge the USGA’s authority as rule makers for the game’s elite players. We simply want to provide a set of rules that reflect the way average recreational golfers play.” Those rules will allow for mulligans, gimmes, simpler procedures concerning water hazards, playing out of divots, anchored putters, etc. If this appeals to you, you can join the cause on the RGAA website. Membership is free. 

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Feb 03, 2014 | 11:19 AM

Tiger In The Looking Glass

Check out this YouTube video of Tiger Woods and Mark O’Meara conducting a clinic during the past weekend's Dubai Desert Classic. Tiger looking at this six-year-old hitting balls must have had the same feeling that pros had 30 years ago when they first saw Tiger play. And it can't have been any easier for Tiger, who is off to his worst start to a season of his career. There’s no information on the kid—name, where he’s from—but it’s worth listening to some of the commentary. O’Meara asks the young man how many tournaments he’s won and the answer sounds like “five or six.” And it seems that the kid is calling his shots, even pointing one out, much to the pros’ amusement. But the most prophetic statement of all might be Tiger’s when he figures out that about the time the kid hits the pro tours, a 50-plus Woods will be in a cart, on the Champions Tour, or more likely sitting at home counting his billions. If anyone does know the youngster’s name, let us know: We'd like to remember it and see if he lives up to the promise.

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Jan 31, 2014 | 06:09 AM

Getting Girls To Golf

As usual, last week’s PGA Merchandise Show featured a number of seminars and discussions about growing the game, notably how to attract new players while getting current players to play more. And, as always, there was a lot of discussion about getting women more interested in golf. Among the organizations trying to do just that is the Executive Women’s Golf Association (EWGA), which has just published a new book called “Teeing Up For Success” that features more than 30 inspirational stories from women who have used golf to achieve their goals in business and life. Right about the same time this book was published, Golf Channel announced that the next installment of its “Big Break” franchise will feature an all-female cast (above). “Big Break Florida” premieres on February 24 with 12 young women who share a different sort of inspirational goal, “a chance to launch their career in professional golf.” We wish them luck, especially if their actions somehow help bring other women to the game.

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Jan 30, 2014 | 10:00 AM

Beach Views

In a state where the major league baseball team’s stadium has a pool just beyond the right field fence, why not watch golf from a beach? Select spectators at this weekend’s Waste Management Phoenix Open in Arizona will do just that. An area well left of the landing area on the TPC Scottsdale's 18th fairway has been newly christened “Thunder Beach,” complete with sand, lifeguard stands and rows of chairs overlooking a small pond. Expect the local scenery lounging there to get plenty of tv airtime when (or if) CBS cuts away from coverage of the infamous 16th hole. You'll need a coveted Greenskeeper badge to put your toes in this exclusive sand though—without a generous friend or solid connection, that will run you at least $3,500 for a package that includes four badges, free drinks and valet parking. But no sunscreen.

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